Real-life advice from a real-life recruiter

Posts tagged ‘college’

Learning to Dance in the Rain

Greetings Fellow Followers!

Reading Inspirational stories about the trials and tribulations of others is one thing- finding gratitude in your own struggles and sufferings is another. It’s easy to appreciate and applaud the courage of others who’ve defeated their pain to find beauty and meaning- but it can be much harder when it’s our turn to rise above.

So what can we learn from others’ experiences? How can we adapt their lessons to our own lives?

Mac Anderson and BJ Gallagher authors of the book “Learning to dance in the rain” give a few tips that may be considered “dance lessons” for the storms that will sooner or later blow into your life.

Dance Lessons

  • Begin by being thankful for what didn’t happen (i.e. you lost your job…but you didn’t lose your health. Your dog died… but your spouse didn’t. Your mother has Alzheimer’s disease but your father doesn’t)
  • Play the glad game or make a gratitude list. The glad game helps you focus on what’s right in your world today instead of what’s wrong. It’s a terrific way to change your attitude in a hurry. Make a list of the things you are grateful for and glad to have. For example: I’m glad I have you as a mom, I’m grateful I have healthy children,   I’m glad I have reliable transportation.
  • Practice forgiveness- let go of resentment. Someone wise once said, “Holding onto resentment is like swallowing poison, and hoping the other person will die” Resentment doesn’t hurt the person you’re angry at- it hurts you.
  • Look for the lesson in every experience-then move on.
  • Make gratitude a habit
  • Teach others how to be grateful- its contagious, you can catch it from others and they can catch it from you. Teach gratitude to others by living it not just scolding people for not being more grateful.

Remember if other people have learned to dance in the rain, so can YOU!

Eat’n Parks Summer Internship Rocks!

Hello Fellow followers! Check out this cool interview from one of Eat’n Parks summer interns- Courtney Hegeman. Courtney is a student attending Robert Morris University and is working towards completing her Bachelors in Hospitality and Tourism. But before you delve into her interview here is a little background on our management internship.

Our Management Internship program is designed to provide college students the opportunity to explore a career with Eat’n Park restaurants!

The internship spans ten weeks and is modeled after our management training program.  This allows each intern the opportunity to experience all departments, learn management functions, and assist in running shifts under the supervision of the general manager.

Courtney’s Interview

Please describe the most important things you learned during your internship

“The most important things I learned during my internship included learning the roles that every team member serves in the restaurant. Working in all of the different departments taught me how each department depends on each other. My duties included assisting in different department positions including greeting, serving, cooking, prep, baking, and assisting the managers with completing paperwork (shift cards, pull lists, prep lists, and payroll)”

Describe which personal and professional strengths you have developed during you Management Internship.

“Professionally, I have developed a management presence. At first, I was nervous about managing a group of people but this experience has given me confidence in myself to do so. I developed practical skills in the kitchen, and prep areas. Personally, I’ve developed more confidence as well as personal drive to succeed in this field because I love it so much!”

 

 

What areas would you have like to develop further during your Internship experience?

“Honestly, the only thing that I wish is that the internship was longer. I know how to do the basics, but would have liked to work on finding the balance between wearing the different “hats” of management. I have always struggled with wearing the “police hat” and correcting people who are set in their own ways which are commonly wrong. Throughout this experience, I genuinely pushed myself to speak up more when needed.”

What did you enjoy the most about the internship?

“All of the people that I got to work with! It honestly started to feel like a little family. No matter how frustrating things would get at times, we all would come together to get the job done. This caused all of us to bond together-which makes the ending of the internship a little sad”

What could we do to make your internship better?

“The only thing I would recommend is to have a day to work one-on-one with the general manager when he is not on duty. This would make it easier to train in certain areas without interruptions.”

Would you recommend Eat’n Parks internship program to peers at your College/University?

“I would definitely recommend Eat’n Parks internship to anyone! It was such an amazing experience and I met so many great people along the way. The company is so amazing from the top down and I loved seeing different angles of how the organization is run.”

Understanding Separate Realities

Hello fellow followers! While enjoying a day at the spa I had the opportunity to relax and read the excerpt “Understanding Separate Realities” from the book “Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff” by Richard Carlson. Reading this chapter struck a cord- since last week’s blog I featured- learning how to connect with people. So, while on the subject of connecting with people, I find real value understanding that people will have separate realities but when connecting you still have the opportunity to build a valuable relationship if you’re willing to understand and learn what makes that individual tic.

Understanding Separate Realities

It’s not a matter of merely tolerating differences but truly understanding and honoring the fact that it literally can’t be any other way. -“Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff”

If you have traveled to foreign countries or seen depictions of them in movies, you are aware of vast differences among cultures. The principle of separate realities says that the differences among individuals is every bit as vast.

Richard Carlson states that understanding individuals have separate realities can virtually eliminate quarrels and helps you develop compassion. Why? Because when we expect to see things differently, we take it as a given that others will do things differently and react differently to the same stimuli, the compassion we have for ourselves and for others rises dramatically. The moment we expect otherwise, the potential for conflict exists.

Being interested, without judgment in the way other people choose to live and behave is a strategy geared toward developing your compassion, as well as a way of becoming more patient. When someone acts in a way that seems unusual to you, rather than reacting in your usual way, such as, “I can’t believe they would do that,” instead say something to yourself like I see, that must be the way she/he sees things in their world.

Connecting the dots…to connecting with people

“You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.” - Dale Carnegie

Hello fellow followers! Connecting with people can sometimes be more challenging and uncomfortable than we think.

Take a look at the following tips on how to connect with people by Scott Dinsmore.  Scott Dinsmore is the founder of Live Your Legend, a coaching and digital product company helping people build a career around work they love.

 

  • Be genuine. The only connections that work will be the ones that you truly care about; the world will see through anything short of that.
  • Pay attention. It’s nearly impossible to genuinely offer help if you don’t pay attention — I mean real attention, not just to what sports and foods they like! Learn about their backgrounds and passions. Invest genuine time in learning what really matters to them and how you can help.
  • Make real friends. Think about how you’ve made the friends you have. That’s all this is. You only make friends with people you genuinely want in your life. Don’t over-think it. Be human, be helpful and most humans will happily be human in return, regardless of who they are.
  • Provide help. Even the biggest and most powerful people in the world have something they’d like help with. Too many people never reach out to those above them due to the fear that they wouldn’t be able to offer anything in return. But you have more to offer than you realize: write an article or blog post about them, share their project with your community, and offer to spread their message through a video interview with them. Give real thought to whom you could connect them with to benefit their goals.

Turn that frown upside down!

Hello fellow followers! We have all dealt with negative emotions in our professional and personal lives, but did you know smiling has many benefits?

Check out the below cool facts about smiling from the pickthebrain.com

  • Forcing yourself to smile can boost your mood: Psychologists have found that even if you’re in bad mood, you can instantly lift your spirits by forcing yourself to smile.
  • It boosts your immune system: Smiling really can improve your physical health, too. Your body is more relaxed when you smile, which contributes to good health and a stronger immune system.
  •   Smiles are contagious: It’s not just a saying: smiling really is contagious, scientists say. In a study conducted in Sweden, people had difficulty frowning when they looked at other subjects who were smiling, and their muscles twitched into smiles all on their own.
  •  Smiles Relieve Stress: Your body immediately releases endorphins when you smile, even when you force it. This sudden change in mood will help you feel better and release stress.
  • It’s easier to smile than to frown: Scientists have discovered that your body has to work harder and use more muscles to frown than it does to smile.
  •   It’s a universal sign of happiness: While hand shakes, hugs, and bows all have varying meanings across cultures, smiling is known around the world and in all cultures as a sign of happiness and acceptance.
  •   Smiling helps you get promoted: Smiles make a person seem more attractive, sociable and confident, and people who smile more are more likely to get a promotion.
  •   Smiles are more attractive than makeup: A research study conducted by Orbit Complete discovered that 69% of people find women more attractive when they smile than when they are wearing makeup.
  •  Smiles use from 5 to 53 facial muscles: Just smiling can require your body to use up to 53 muscles, but some smiles only use 5 muscle movements.

 

 

Know thyself…

Hello fellow followers!

Many people live in peaceful ignorance of themselves and their needs, others not wanting to know for fear of what they would have to address. After reading an article by Emotional Health Expert Elaine Sihera, I thought we’d all find value in understanding ourselves. Below you’ll find her POV on why knowing yourself is so important for the following three reasons:

First, you have to live with yourself 24/7

No one in your life will be with you as much as you are with yourself. Would you live with a stranger for so long without knowing anything about them? Really, it is about self-awareness. Who you are, what you like and want, where you are going, what makes you happy and what makes you irritated. Those are very vital things to know if you are to improve the quality of your life and benefit from the things which make you happiest.

Second, self-awareness builds confidence

The more you know about you, the greater you will feel emotionally and the more adept you will become at dealing with situations. You then become more intuitive about what works for you and what doesn’t. Self-awareness is a powerful tool for improving competence because you will be pushed along directions which make you feel good rather than living in a vague way from day to day, not knowing how you feel or what you should do.

Finally, self-awareness boosts identity

If you don’t know much about your background, history, culture, gender and what you value, how will you get on with others in mutual respect? They cannot respect what they don’t understand. People who lack self-awareness tend to be ambiguous and make others feel uncomfortable because they are never sure what to do. So ignorance about the self is not a good thing

What is the first step of getting to know me?

The first step to getting to know you would be-asks questions. Just as you would with anything topic or person that you’d like to know a little better, do the same for yourself. Here are a few starter questions that you can begin to ask that will provoke so thought.

  • When do I have the most energy? Day or Night.
  • What makes me happy?
  • What makes me unhappy?
  • Do I like to work with people?
  • Am I energetic?
  • What do I do really well?
  • What do I like about myself?
  • Am I pessimistic or optimistic?
  • What’s my best quality?
  • What’s my worst quality?
  • What do I not like about myself?
  • What is my motto?
  • What’s my biggest worry?

 

“He who knows others is wise; he who knows himself is enlightened.” ―Lao Tzu

There is no I in TEAM!

Hello fellow followers! Let’s face it- there is no I in the word TEAM and to get to get things done these days, working in teams is almost imperative.

But how can you, as a leader, encourage a team to achieve your objectives? How can you avoid common errors that can kill performance and morale? Check out the article below authored by Calvin Sun who discusses 5 ways of keeping your team focused and on track.

 

1. Believe in your team’s objectives

Do you believe in what you want the team to accomplish? Do you think your goals are realistic? If not, rethink your position, because your team will sense your uncertainty. You may say the right words, but your body language and overall demeanor will give you away. On the other hand, if you truly are dedicated and believe in your goals, your team will sense it and will react accordingly.

2. Model the behavior you want from the team

Don’t be a hypocrite — lead by example. You want your team to interact courteously and professionally with others, but do you do so yourself? If you ask them to put in extra hours, are you there along with them? Country artist Rodney Atkins sings about how one day, his four-year-old son said “a four-letter word,” but how later that night, all by himself he got on his knees and prayed. What did the son say when asked about how he learned to do both things? “I’ve been watchin’ you.”

3. Keep a positive attitude

  • Game 1 of the NBA Finals has just begun. Fifteen seconds into the game, one team connects on a field goal, making the score 2-0. The other coach slumps in his chair, puts his head in his hands, and yells, “@(*@&@, this series is OVER!!”
  • (On November 12, 1989): Person 1: “The Berlin Wall just came down!” Person 2: “Horrible! The guards are now out of a job!”

Don’t laugh. If you have these attitudes, how do you think your team will react? If you model a negative attitude, your team will pick it up. I know it sounds trite, but try to stay upbeat.

Doing so doesn’t mean being unrealistic. It does mean, however, that you try to look at the glass as being half full rather than half empty. Instead of saying, for example, “This project will never succeed because of issues 1, 2, and 3,” consider saying, “If we want this project to succeed, it’s critical that we resolve issues 1, 2, and 3.”

4. Be clear about your goals

It’s hard for your team to accomplish its goals if those goals are unclear or unknown to them. More important, it’s hard to get them even to agree with those goals if they don’t know what they are. Make sure your team knows what you are expecting of them. If you can quantify

10 reasons to Volunteer

Hello Fellow followers! It’s a pretty common to think of volunteering as just something nice that people can do. Sure, it may make you feel good about helping, but what impact does it really have on others?

If you’ve been considering volunteering I strongly recommend you check out the following reasons why volunteering is important.

10.) It’s good for you. Volunteering provides physical and mental rewards. It:

  • Reduces stress: Experts report that when you focus on someone other than yourself, it interrupts usual tension-producing patterns.
  • Makes you healthier: Moods and emotions, like optimism, joy, and control over one’s fate, strengthen the immune system.

9.) It saves resources. Volunteering provides valuable community services so  more money can be spent on local improvements.

  • The estimated value of a volunteer’s time is $15.39 per hour.

8.) Volunteers gain professional experience.

  • You can test out a career.

7.) It brings people together. As a volunteer you assist in:

  • Uniting people from diverse backgrounds to work toward a common goal
  • Building camaraderie and teamwork

6.) It promotes personal growth and self esteem.

  • Understanding community needs helps foster empathy and develops your own belief to succeed in particular situations.

5.) Volunteering strengthens your community. As a volunteer you help:

  • Support families (daycare and eldercare)
  • Improve schools (tutoring, literacy)
  • Support youth (mentoring and after-school programs)
  • Beautify the community (beach and park cleanups)

4.) You learn a lot. Volunteers learn things like these:

  • Self: Volunteers discover hidden talents that may change your view on your self worth.
  • Government: Through working with local non-profit agencies, volunteers learn about the functions and operation of our government.
  • Community: Volunteers gain knowledge of local resources available to solve community needs.

3.) You get a chance to give back.

  • People like to support community resources that they use themselves or that benefit people they care about.

2.) Volunteering encourages civic responsibility.

  • Community service and volunteerism are an investment in our community and the people who live in it.

1.) You make a difference.

Every person counts!

“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.” ~Plato

Hello fellow followers. I’m sure you can all relate to there being times of you not wanting to be kind to people who aren’t behaving friendly to you-especially when you’ve done nothing to warrant ill treatment or discourteous comments.

-So how can we try to be kinder to people, especially when we don’t feel like it? Check out “Tiny Buddha’s” quick tips on kindness By Fiona Robyn

 

1. Try to notice when you feel the need to be unkind to someone.

If it’s too late and you’ve already said something mean, then complete the following steps anyway and you might learn something for next time. It might also give you an opportunity to apologize to the person you’ve been unkind to—“I know I was angry about what you’ve done, but I shouldn’t have said what I said. I’m sorry.”

2. Ask yourself why you are feeling an urge to be unkind.

Is it because you’ve had a bad morning, or because you’re feeling hurt or insecure? Is it because the other person has said something that has made you angry or upset?

3. If you want to be unkind because you’ve been hurt or you’re feeling insecure, then acknowledge the part of you that feels hurt.

Try to deal with this without taking it out on somebody else. Be kind to yourself.

4. If you want to be unkind because the other person has said something horrible to you, then you can do two things:

Try to make sense of why you feel so hurt. Did what the person said to you have a grain of truth in it, or are you afraid that it might? Is this why it upset you or made you angry?

Remember that the other person is fighting their own hard battle. They might have had their own terrible morning/week/life. You’re just unlucky that they’re taking it out on you. If what they’ve said to you doesn’t feel personal any more, it will have much less power to affect you.

5. THINK POSITIVE:

Think positive. For every negative person or situation that you encounter, think two positive thoughts. Say something positive to people you meet even if they’re really annoying you. It helps even more to go through your day thinking of something funny. When you think positively, and picture positive things in your head, you can’t help but feel more positive, and then this will manifest physically in the form of a nice smile and nice behavior.

Email Etiquette

Good Day Fellow Followers! Check out the following tips on email etiquette –from Laura Stack president of The Productivity Pro.

Use these suggestions as a starting point to create e-mail etiquette rules that will help your team stay efficient and professional.

1.) Be informal, not sloppy.

Your colleagues may use commonly accepted abbreviations in e-mail, but when communicating with external customers, everyone should follow standard writing protocol. Your e-mail message reflects you and your company, so traditional spelling, grammar, and punctuation rules apply.

2.) Keep messages brief and to the point.

Just because your writing is grammatically correct does not mean that it has to be long. Nothing is more frustrating than wading through an e-mail message that is twice as long as necessary. Concentrate on one subject per message whenever possible.

3.) Use sentence case.

USING ALL CAPITAL LETTERS LOOKS AS IF YOU’RE SHOUTING. Using all lowercase letters looks lazy. For emphasis, use asterisks or bold formatting to emphasize important words. Do not, however, use a lot of colors or graphics embedded in your message, because not everyone uses an e-mail program that can display them.

4.) Remember that your tone can’t be heard in e-mail.

Have you ever attempted sarcasm in an e-mail, and the recipient took it the wrong way? E-mail communication can’t convey the nuances of verbal communication. In an attempt to infer tone of voice, some people use emoticons, but use them sparingly so that you don’t appear unprofessional. Also, don’t assume that using a smiley will diffuse a difficult message.

5.) Summarize long discussions.

Scrolling through pages of replies to understand a discussion is annoying. Instead of continuing to forward a message string, take a minute to summarize it for your reader. You could even highlight or quote the relevant passage, then include your response. Some words of caution:

  • If you are forwarding or reposting a message you’ve received, do not change the wording.
  • If you want to repost to a group a message that you received individually, ask the author for permission first.
  • Give proper attribution.

 

 

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