Real-life advice from a real-life recruiter

Archive for August, 2014

It’s not them…it’s your Attitude

Greetings fellow followers! Check out this passage by Charles Swindoll.

I challenge you to implement at least one of the below tips into your daily routine.

“The longer I live, the more I realize

the impact of attitude on life.

Attitude to me is more important than facts.

It is more important than the past, than education,

than money, than circumstances, than failures,

than success, than what other people think or say or do.

It is more important than appearance, gift, or skill.

It will make or break a company…a church…a home.

The remarkable thing is we have a choice everyday

regarding the attitude we will embrace for that day.

We can not change our past…

The only thing we can do is play on the string we have,

And that is our attitude. I am convinced that life is 10%

What happens to me and 90% how I react to it.

And so it is with you…we are in charge

of our attitudes”.

 CHARLES SWINDOLL

pastor, author

So how do I change my attitude? Good question-Here is two ways you can actively adjust your attitude when you’re not feeling so content.

Monitor your thoughts and substitute new ones-it takes some practice, but once you master it, you’ll find this skill to be a godsend. Because our feelings are connected to our thoughts, if we can change our thoughts, we can change our feelings. But before you can do that you have to be aware of what you’re thinking. Practice by listening to the voice in your head, the inner one that is probably often critical and cranky. Notice what it’s saying when you’re feeling your bad mood. Then ask yourself- what thought would be a more positive one? Deliberately work to insert that one instead, and make yourself think it.

Question yourself and your attitude-One way to get to a point and changing your attitude is to play the game of questioning your attitudes, especially ones you hold on to. Ask where they have come from. Ask what they are serving. Ask what you’re getting by not letting them go… journaling can be really helpful for this. We hold onto things generally because they serve some purpose. Or we hold onto thoughts because we can’t see a way around them. Write them down, and evaluate if they are truly worth focusing on repeatedly.

Remember your attitude affects your altitude. See you at the top!

Learning to Dance in the Rain

Greetings Fellow Followers!

Reading Inspirational stories about the trials and tribulations of others is one thing- finding gratitude in your own struggles and sufferings is another. It’s easy to appreciate and applaud the courage of others who’ve defeated their pain to find beauty and meaning- but it can be much harder when it’s our turn to rise above.

So what can we learn from others’ experiences? How can we adapt their lessons to our own lives?

Mac Anderson and BJ Gallagher authors of the book “Learning to dance in the rain” give a few tips that may be considered “dance lessons” for the storms that will sooner or later blow into your life.

Dance Lessons

  • Begin by being thankful for what didn’t happen (i.e. you lost your job…but you didn’t lose your health. Your dog died… but your spouse didn’t. Your mother has Alzheimer’s disease but your father doesn’t)
  • Play the glad game or make a gratitude list. The glad game helps you focus on what’s right in your world today instead of what’s wrong. It’s a terrific way to change your attitude in a hurry. Make a list of the things you are grateful for and glad to have. For example: I’m glad I have you as a mom, I’m grateful I have healthy children,   I’m glad I have reliable transportation.
  • Practice forgiveness– let go of resentment. Someone wise once said, “Holding onto resentment is like swallowing poison, and hoping the other person will die” Resentment doesn’t hurt the person you’re angry at- it hurts you.
  • Look for the lesson in every experience-then move on.
  • Make gratitude a habit
  • Teach others how to be grateful- its contagious, you can catch it from others and they can catch it from you. Teach gratitude to others by living it not just scolding people for not being more grateful.

Remember if other people have learned to dance in the rain, so can YOU!

Eat’n Parks Summer Internship Rocks!

Hello Fellow followers! Check out this cool interview from one of Eat’n Parks summer interns- Courtney Hegeman. Courtney is a student attending Robert Morris University and is working towards completing her Bachelors in Hospitality and Tourism. But before you delve into her interview here is a little background on our management internship.

Our Management Internship program is designed to provide college students the opportunity to explore a career with Eat’n Park restaurants!

The internship spans ten weeks and is modeled after our management training program.  This allows each intern the opportunity to experience all departments, learn management functions, and assist in running shifts under the supervision of the general manager.

Courtney’s Interview

Please describe the most important things you learned during your internship

“The most important things I learned during my internship included learning the roles that every team member serves in the restaurant. Working in all of the different departments taught me how each department depends on each other. My duties included assisting in different department positions including greeting, serving, cooking, prep, baking, and assisting the managers with completing paperwork (shift cards, pull lists, prep lists, and payroll)”

Describe which personal and professional strengths you have developed during you Management Internship.

“Professionally, I have developed a management presence. At first, I was nervous about managing a group of people but this experience has given me confidence in myself to do so. I developed practical skills in the kitchen, and prep areas. Personally, I’ve developed more confidence as well as personal drive to succeed in this field because I love it so much!”

 

 

What areas would you have like to develop further during your Internship experience?

“Honestly, the only thing that I wish is that the internship was longer. I know how to do the basics, but would have liked to work on finding the balance between wearing the different “hats” of management. I have always struggled with wearing the “police hat” and correcting people who are set in their own ways which are commonly wrong. Throughout this experience, I genuinely pushed myself to speak up more when needed.”

What did you enjoy the most about the internship?

“All of the people that I got to work with! It honestly started to feel like a little family. No matter how frustrating things would get at times, we all would come together to get the job done. This caused all of us to bond together-which makes the ending of the internship a little sad”

What could we do to make your internship better?

“The only thing I would recommend is to have a day to work one-on-one with the general manager when he is not on duty. This would make it easier to train in certain areas without interruptions.”

Would you recommend Eat’n Parks internship program to peers at your College/University?

“I would definitely recommend Eat’n Parks internship to anyone! It was such an amazing experience and I met so many great people along the way. The company is so amazing from the top down and I loved seeing different angles of how the organization is run.”