Real-life advice from a real-life recruiter

Archive for March, 2015

Bullying

Hello Fellow followers!

Did you know that bullying not only occurs in schools and homes but also at work? – Yes work!

So how does this happen? Well according to Times Business and Money magazine authors- Bullying in the workplace continues because the leadership of the company often isn’t aware of their behavior, either because it goes unreported (many victims are too frightened or embarrassed to draw attention to their plight) or because the bullies are good at masking their behavior and/or fooling their superiors.

Many bullies are very socially skilled, and use their bullying behavior strategically to coerce others into providing them the resources needed to achieve their work-related objectives.

Facts about Bullying on the job -The workplace bullying Institute survey

  • 50% of Americans have not experienced or witnessed bullying, but 35% have been bullied; 15% have witnessed bullying.
  • Bosses comprise 72% of bullies.
  • More men (62%) are bullies and women are the most frequent targets of bullies (58%).
  • Women bullies target other women (80%).
  • Up to 81% of employers are perceived as doing nothing and resisting taking action when targets of bullying fill out a survey. In the general public, only 44.8% perceive the employers as doing nothing.
  • 45% of people targeted by a bully experience stress-related health problems including debilitating anxiety, panic attacks, and clinical depression (39%).

Types of bullying behaviors:

  • Exhibiting condescending behavior that puts people on edge and makes them unable to function professionally
  • Verbal
  • Physical threatening others
  • Intimidating others

 

How to stop bullying in the workplace?

  • Describe the behavior you see the bully exhibiting – don’t edit or offer opinions, just describe what you see. ie (You regularly enter my cubicle, lean over my shoulder, and read my personal correspondence on my computer screen.)
  • Tell the bully exactly how his/her behavior is impacting your work. (Because much of my work is confidential, these actions make me feel as if I need to hide what I am working on from you, or change a screen which is a waste of my time.)

 

Remember you want to be strategic when engaging the bully BUT you also want them to know that you will stand your ground if they continue to challenge you after you’ve addressed the disruptive behavior.



What not to ask

Hello fellow followers, did you know that having sharp interviewing skills is important to you landing the job. But did you also know that asking the wrong questions can lead to your interviewer questioning your candidacy? Take a look at the top five questions to NOT to ask in your first interview…

1.) How soon do you promote employees?

“An individual asking this question may come off as arrogant and entitled,” says recruiter Josh Tolan of SparkHire.com.

2.) Questions that start with “why?”

Why? It’s a matter of psychology. These kinds of questions put people on the defensive, says Kohut. She advises repositioning a question such as, “Why did the company lay off people last year?” to a less confrontational, “I read about the layoffs you had. What’s your opinion on how the company is positioned for the future?”

3.) “Who is your competition?”

This is a great example of a question that could either make you sound thoughtful … or totally backfire and reveal that you did zero research about the company prior to the interview, says Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter of CareerTrend.net. Before asking any question, determine whether it’s something you could have figured out yourself through a Google search. If it is, a) don’t ask it and b) do that Google search before your interview!

4.) “How often do reviews occur?”

Maybe you’re concerned about the company’s view of your performance, or maybe you’re just curious, but nix any questions about the company’s review or self-appraisal policies. “It makes us think you’re concerned with how often negative feedback might be delivered,” says Kohut. Keep your confidence intact, and avoid the topic altogether–or at least until you receive an offer.

5.) “May I arrive early or leave late as long as I get my hours in?”

Even if you make it clear that you’re hoping for a flexible schedule to accommodate a legitimate concern such as picking up your kids from daycare, Barrett-Poindexter advises against this question. “While work-life balance is a very popular concern right now, it’s not the most pressing consideration for a hiring decision-maker,” she says. “Insinuating early on that you’re concerned about balancing your life may indicate to your employer that you are more concerned about your needs and less concerned about the company’s.