Real-life advice from a real-life recruiter

Posts tagged ‘behavorial interviewing’

When looking to hire, being too narrow in your search could be limiting your success

According to Paul Wolfe, Sr. VP of HR at Indeed, he says one of the biggest mistakes in hiring is not having a diverse slate of candidates. “Think of diversity of age, experience, background, race and gender, all of which help bring diversity of thought,” Wolfe said. “[This] can make organizations more successful and keep organizations growing and progressing.”

Once you have identified your hiring need, make sure you are looking to interview many different types of people. Not only will this increase the hiring traffic in your restaurant, it will also make your restaurant more interesting to future team members. You will begin to attract better talent as you widen and hire new team members. You will also be surprised of what they can bring to the table. The better the hiring choices you make, the better your location will run.

A good diverse work staff will also radiate a good reputation. Customers notice everything, from a clean restroom to an amazing server. Don’t customers turn into employees? Also, your diverse team members will spread the word to friends and family, increasing your application flow. You never know where the next superstar is coming from.

You should not be searching for someone just like you or the rest of your team members. Don’t be afraid to bring in experience from another concept or someone that may challenge our company. Being open to options will also make you and your team grow and find ways to do something in another way.

Look outside the box. It can bring you a staffed restaurant, new ways of solving problems, more future applicants, a killer reputation and increased sales!

We did it AGAIN… Eat’n Park is named winner for Best Practices!

We did it AGAIN….Eat’n Park is again named winner for Best Practices 2012.

People Report and Black Box Intelligence revealed the winners of their 2012 Best Practices awards which honor restaurant companies for exceptional workplace practices and results.

People Report said honorees were evaluated on their retention of both managers and employees, the diversity of their workforces, compensation practices, community involvement, corporate responsibility and initiatives in sustainable practices.

“These awards are coveted and are not easily given – These are not popularity contests the companies are evaluated on quantitative measures.”-  Joni Thomas Doolin, Founder and chief executive of the People Report.

Our very own Karen Bolden attributes our success to great operating teams back in the field that keep a smile not only on our guests’ faces but on our team members’ faces also. She talks about how we engage our company to challenge our leadership to volunteer and to engage each other.

Engagement and the ultimate cost

 With today’s economy and war-for-talent, turnover alone is something businesses must think about for the future, as it’s directly connected to engagement. Disengagement can be challenging to remedy; also, it costs organizations billions a year in lost productivity alone.

As a leader within my company how can I increase engagement among my employees?

  • PEER-TO-PEER      RECOGNITION – done right! Create  a viral culture of recognition in your business by creating ways for your     employees to give recognition to each other.
  • PERFORMANCE      RECOGNITION– that gets results!  When you give recognition for performance, you inspire your people to reach their full potential. This can be done by providing gifts cards,  free meals, or being open to ways they’d like to be rewarded for their      performance.

SPOT RECOGNITION that’s on the spot!  Create managers’ kits with award certificates, reward coupons,      appreciation cards and more. These are ways to instantly appreciate      employees. It gives them “bragging rights” and also creates an environment  for friendly competition.

Thank you for all you do to keep our guests and team members smiling!

You got the interview?!

You worked really hard and finally got a face to face interview. Great job! You don’t want to blow it now by doing or saying something silly. Because I like you so much I’ll share my own 10 MOST interviewing pet peeves.

  1. Being late – Whatever you do DON’T. BE. LATE! But, don’t be      super early either. If you are not sure were you are going for your      interview take a test drive earlier in the week. Time yourself and notice      how difficult finding a parking space will be. If you are taking a bus      find out when the buses are running and where you will be dropped off.      Plan to arrive for your interview early then find somewhere in the area to      kill some time. You want to walk into the interviewer’s office about 5      minutes earlier than your appointment time.
  2. Appearance – Yes. Appearance counts. You      want to look clean, neat and crisp. But, remember, you are not going on a      date. Dress for the position and the company where you want to work.  Check out the company’s website to find      out their appearance standards. Yes, that may mean you may have to wear a      suit and maybe a tie. This may also mean that you need to tone down your      hair. Your appearance is your first impression. You never get a second chance      to give a first impression.
  3. No questions – Research the company you are      interviewing with. You don’t want to ask a ridiculous question like what      do you produce? Big mistake there. You want to show that you are engaged      and want to work there so have at least two questions.
  4. No examples – You know some of the questions      that the interviewer is going to ask you. Have some well worded answers      prepared to the following questions. What is your biggest strength? What      is your biggest weakest? How did you impact… in your last position. Why      are you applying to this position?       What are your goals? Where do you want to be in 5 years? One word      and vague answers will only get you shown the door.
  5. Bad mouthing a former      boss – Even if      your last boss was a crazy, manic, lazy, bully – don’t bad mouth them in an interview. Don’t make      yourself a victim.
  6. No eye contact – Look at the interviewer when      answering their questions, but don’t stare at them like a crazed goat. Or      talk to their wall or plant for that matter.
  7. Being the walking      dead – If you      want the job show that you do. Be engaged in the interview. Acting and      looking like a zombie won’t get you the job.
  8. Chewing gum – No drinking, smoking or gum      chewing period. Why even talk about it.
  9. Not being realistic      – What job are      you applying for? Is the going market really a million dollars a      year?  Get real. Don’t ask for      something everyone knows is impossible.
  10. Not asking for the      job – Ask the      interviewer how you did. Let them know your really want this job. If you      don’t ask you’ll never receive.

One Woman’s POV on Why YOU Should Work in the Hospitality Industry

I have worked in the hospitality industry for over 30 years. I would tell you exactly how long I have worked in this industry, but you’re pretty smart and I know you can add. But I’m not going to.  Because if I do you’ll then realize just how ancient I am.  I will let you know, however, that I started in the industry when I was four with a well attended tea party. My party guests were very well mannered and light eaters.

… Anyway,  I’ll get back to our topic. Why would anyone want to work in the hospitality field?

  1. You can start a career immediately.

Can’t afford to further your education? The hospitality field is one of the last fields that do not require a college degree to progress into management. Most candidates do qualify for entry level positions. After you get the job it depends on how well you do the job and how far you want to progress.  However, there are some qualities that you do need to be successful in the field. One is you that you have to like people. Not just think that you like people. Genuinely like people. Sometimes people are hard to like. Something strange happens to people when something goes wrong with their food and/or lodging. Some people turn in to creatures from the back lagoon. It’s not pretty. So you definitely have to have a basic like of people. Two, you have to like change. What I mean by change is working different hours, days and times. You also have to learn new menus and products at a drop of a hat. You need to be flexible to the point that you feel you are related to Gumby or that you are changing into a different life form without boundaries. Finally, you need to be able to work hard. I know, boring, but true. This is why you need to like the work you do.

  1. Hospitality is everywhere.

The Hospitality industry is worldwide. Human beings need food & drink and shelter wherever they happen to be. There are a ton of different venues. You can work in hotels, restaurants, casinos, or anywhere that serves food and gives folks a place to stay. You can work in whatever venue floats your boat. (You could even work on the boat!) Everyone has its different savior faire. This is where internships have value. If you happen to be pursuing a hospitality degree, take advantage of internships. You won’t know if you like something until you have tried. Completing internships, in different venues, is a great way to find the part of the industry where you feel that you fit best. And to be successful in this industry you have to like what you do.

  1. Great career progression.

How far do you want to progress in your career? Can’t stand having a boss? Get hospitality experience and open your own place. Want to do different jobs? Ask the manager to train you in as many departments as possible. Lots of Vice Presidents have started as dishwashers, servers or in some sort of hourly position. I started as a set up girl. Pretty cool, huh? Now, I’m no Vice President but I am the Director of Recruiting and that’s not too shabby. Want to be a General Manager or a Multi Unit Manager? Just go ask someone in your hospitality company, or a hospitality company that interests you, what you need to do to make that happen. Remember experience is everything. Get on the training team. Go support that restaurant or hotel opening. Take those stretch assignments. Gain that experience you need in order to reach your goals.

  1. Perks.

Some companies perks are better then others. But most of the hospitality companies give free food  and non-alcoholic drinks to management. Free food, totally awesome. Talk about taking a bite out of your home food bill. You may also be able to eat out more often because of the food discounts you get. Many companies give their team members at least a 20% discount on food and non-alcoholic drinks. I know when I’m buying I like to recommend we eat in a restaurant owned by my company. I know the value of a buck. Hospitality folks usually know how to have fun. Test it out. I’ve been to plenty of hospitality conferences then go to with my hospitality brother’s and sister’s.  My actual sister is a scientist so I have attended scientific events and yes there is a big difference on the “fun” level. Not those scientists aren’t a good time… they’re just more subdued than hospitality folks.

  1. Lights. Camera.  Action!

Believe it or not – you are on a stage in the dining room. It’s the closest I’ve gotten to Hollywood or Broadway.  The hospitality atmosphere is a bit different than in other industries. You can work in a 5 star resort that looks like a palace or a restaurant that feels like Italy. You can work on a cruise ship where everyone is there to have fun and has no worries. You pick your atmosphere and set your own stage.

  1. People will always need to eat.

I haven’t read any reports from futurists that people won’t need to eat in 2050. So a safe bet would be that folks are set going to eat out. Now, I realize that the economy does affect the hospitality industry, but people may be more aware of prices and change their habits. In general, people are still going to eat out and they are still going to take vacations.  If you are in a segment of the hospitality industry negatively affected by the economy, switch to another segment. You have transferable skills.

Now go out there and start a career! Eat’n Park is a great place to start. Check out our website at http://www.eatnpark.com

So you want to be a Certified Shift Supervisor for Eat’n Park?

The first thing that you will need to do is read through the following job description.  Make sure that working in a supervisory position is something that you can and want to do. The next thing that you will need to do is visit an Eat’n Park restaurant and ask for an application. Try to visit the restaurant between the hours of 2 and 4 PM and pick a weekday. If you do this, the higher the probability that you will get an interview on the spot.

JOB SUMMARY

Assists management team by performing similar duties and objectives.  Assists in maintaining established costs and quality standards to ensure proper preparation and service of food to the satisfaction of guests. Also required to perform other tasks as directed by a supervisor.

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS

Projects a leadership image in verbal and written communications.

  • Uses the restaurant daily diary to communicate with management team.
  • Reads and takes appropriate action on all memos and notices.
  • Assists management in keeping team members aware of any changes in policies and procedures.
  • Communicates with guests and handles guest comments using service plus skills.
  • Occasionally attends restaurant biweekly meetings.

Assist management in enforcing controls and systems to meet or exceed goals.

  • Properly prepares all company required forms and reports (i.e cash slips, order forms, maintenance reports, etc.) as determined by general manager.
  • Monitors team members clocking in and out to maintain a consistent payroll.
  • Understands federal and state labor laws.
  • Follows effective cash control systems as outlines in the operations manual.
  • Eliminates food and supply waste by enforcing systems and polices.

Operational Execution

  • Ensures that team members are following company standards and procedures including appearance and hygiene.
  • Consistently follows company policy on food quality, cleanliness, and service to ensure maximum guest satisfaction.
  • Ensure that food is served in correct portions, properly garnished, and at proper temperatures.
  •  Inspects dining room, food receiving, preparation, production, and storage areas to ensure that health and safety regulations are adhered to at all times.
  • Ensures compliance with all regulatory standards in the area of food safety and sanitation.
  • Follows company directive, guidelines, responsibilities, and meets all deadlines.
  • Communicates feedback from guests and team members, to management, on issues concerning morale and guest satisfaction.
  • Follow all Eat’ n Park guest satisfaction procedures including i-care and service imperatives.
  • Responsible for maintaining daily temperature logs.

Human Resource Practices

  • Adheres to company human resource policies and procedures.
  • Treats team members with fairness and respect.
  • Continually adheres to federal and state employment laws.
  • Maintains morale on shift through a sense of urgency, professionalism, and team building.
  • Cleary communicates with other members of the management team.
  • Builds teamwork during shift through getting involved in operations where needed, addressing conflicts between team members quickly, consistently listening, and getting to know the team members.
  • Informs team members of tasks, assignments, and expectations at the beginning of the shift.
  • Sets example by acting consistently with the organizations values.
  • Serves as a role model for team members by maintaining standards for appearance, dress, and attendance.
  • Maintains a plan for self-development and professional growth.

QUALIFICATIONS

Must be capable of performing job duties of each hourly position.  Must demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between effectively managing people and ensuring maximum guest satisfaction.  Must display strong verbal and written communication skills, project self-confidence, authority, and enthusiasm.  Must demonstrate high standards of professional conduct and strive to grow professionally through continuous self-development and participation.  Must be trained in service plus and servsafe programs.

PHYSICAL DEMANDS

The physical demands described here are representative of those that must be met by a team member to successfully perform the essential functions of this job.

  • Standing and/or walking – 100% of time.
  • Occasionally lifting up to 50 lbs.
  • Frequently lifting up to 25 lbs.

So you want to be an Expediter for Eat’n Park?

The first thing that you will need to do is read through the following job description.  Make sure that expediting is something that you can and want to do. The next thing that you will need to do is visit an Eat’n Park restaurant and ask for an application. Try to visit the restaurant between the hours of 2 and 4 PM and pick a weekday. If you do this, the higher the probability that you will get an interview on the spot.

JOB SUMMARY

Responsible for making sure Eat’ n Park’s time standards are being met by expediting our guest’s food with a sense of urgency as outlined in the department training guide. Team members are also required to perform other tasks as directed by a supervisor.

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS

  1. Coordinating the prompt serving of quality food having it delivered to the guest within two minutes promoting the “first server” system.
  2. Assembling and checking every plate for quality and presentation.
  3. Expediting the food through the pass through window and segregating the food with dividers.
  4. Proactively communicating with cooks in order to alert management of any foreseeable problems.
  5. Follow proper procedures for take out including answering the take out phone within three rings.
  6. Keeping the pantry area clean and well stocked.
  7. Follow company safety and sanitation policies and procedures.
  8. Follow company attendance policy including arriving for work timely, following calling off procedures, and maintaining an acceptable attendance record.
  9. Follow the uniform dress code and maintain proper personal hygiene.
  10. Follow all Eat’n Park guest satisfaction procedures including i-care and service imperatives.
  11. Work well with others and assist fellow team members as needed.

QUALIFICATIONS

To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential function satisfactorily.  Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions and physical demands of the job.

  •  Pass the Expeditor certification exam with a score of 90% or better.

PHYSICAL DEMANDS

The physical demands described here are representative of those that must be met by a team member to successfully perform the essential functions of this job.

  • Standing and/or walking – 100% of time.
  • Occasionally lifting up to 50 lbs.
  • Frequently lifting up to 20 lbs.

So you want to be a Cook for Eat’n Park?

The first thing that you will need to do is read through the following job description.  Make sure that cooking is something that you can and want to do. The next thing that you will need to do is visit an Eat’n Park restaurant and ask for an application. Try to visit the restaurant between the hours of 2 and 4 PM and pick a weekday. If you do this, the higher the probability that you will get an interview on the spot.

JOB SUMMARY

Responsible for the quality, quantity, and timeliness of food production. Team member prepares the food in accordance with Eat’ n Park recipes, standards, and procedures under strict sanitary conditions as outlined in the department training guide. Team members are also required to perform other tasks as directed by a supervisor.

 ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS

  1.  Properly prepare orders from the guest check following company approved portions, recipe specifications, and timing standards.
  2. Follow company safety and sanitation policies and procedures.
  3. Properly date, store, stock, and rotate food items.
  4. Follow HACCP guidelines in preparation and re-heating of food products.
  5. Maintain an open line of communication with management on products, supplies, and condition of equipment.
  6. Follow cleaning schedule as provided by management using “clean as you go” techniques.
  7. Follow company attendance policy including arriving for work timely, calling off procedures, and acceptable attendance records.
  8. Follow the uniform dress code and maintain proper personal hygiene.
  9. Follow all Eat’n Park guest satisfaction procedures including i-care and service imperatives.
  10. Work well with others and assist fellow team members as needed.

QUALIFICATIONS

To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential function satisfactorily.  Reasonable accommodations will be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform essential tasks.

  •  Pass the Cook certification exam with a score of 90% or better.

PHYSICAL DEMANDS

The physical demands described here are representative of those that must be met by a team member to successfully perform the essential functions of this job.

  • Standing and/or walking – 100% of time.
  • Occasionally lifting up to 50 lbs.
  • Frequently lifting up to 20 lbs.
  • Working in temperatures that may exceed 90 degrees