Real-life advice from a real-life recruiter

Posts tagged ‘free food’

The benefits of a smile!

Hello fellow followers! We have all dealt with negative emotions in our professional and personal lives, but did you know smiling has many benefits?

 

Check out the below cool facts about smiling from the pickthebrain.com

 

 

 

  • Smiles are contagious: It’s not just a saying: smiling really is contagious, scientists say. In a study conducted in Sweden, people had difficulty frowning when they looked at other subjects who were smiling, and their muscles twitched into smiles all on their own.

 

  • Smiles Relieve Stress: Your body immediately releases endorphins when you smile, even when you force it. This sudden change in mood will help you feel better and release stress.
  • It’s easier to smile than to frown: Scientists have discovered that your body has to work harder and use more muscles to frown than it does to smile.

 

  • It’s a universal sign of happiness: While hand shakes, hugs, and bows all have varying meanings across cultures, smiling is known around the world and in all cultures as a sign of happiness and acceptance.

 

  • Smiling helps you get promoted: Smiles make a person seem more attractive, sociable and confident, and people who smile more are more likely to get a promotion.

 

 

 

Gracefully exiting a conversation

Hello Fellow Followers…

Have you ever gone to a social event in order to meet new people, network, or perhaps build a more robust social life? Of course you have!!! And call me psychic but I also know that you’ve had those very awkward moments where you’ve been cornered by a conversation hog or quite frankly don’t know how to gracefully exit the conversation and begin another for fear of coming across rude.

Well worry no more! Check out these exit statements that will help you ease discussion departures and politely remove yourself from the occasional “conversation hog”.

Graceful exit statements

  • “It’s been really nice talking to you” or “It was nice meeting you”

 

If someone says that to you say “Thanks, I enjoyed it too”…and move on

  • “You’ll have to excuse me, I spotted my friend from across the room and I want to make sure I say hello. It’s been really nice talking with you, have a great night!”
  • “Maybe I’ll run into you later” or “Maybe we can pick up this discussion later” if you want to circle back to talk to them again.

Other reasons to leave:

  • You need to feed the parking meter.
  • You need to step outside to make a phone call.
  • You need to get another drink.
  • You need to visit the bathroom.
  • You need to ask so-and-so a question.

More tips:

Don’t worry if your reason is a white lie. You may not actually need to use the restroom when you excuse yourself. That’s ok. Go to the rest room, wash your hands, collect yourself, and when you come out find yourself a new conversational partner.

It’s not a question. You’re not asking permission to leave; you’re informing that you’re leaving. So state “So nice talking with you! I need to excuse myself. If I don’t talk to you later, enjoy the party” and then walk away.

If the person doesn’t take the hint, you can escalate/interrupt. “I’m so sorry to cut you off, but I need to step away for a moment. Maybe we’ll pick this up later!” and then leave the area.

See you at the top!

 

Team Member Retention

Hello Fellow Followers…It’s no secret that the work can be tough. Check out the following tips of retention…

 

  • Take a personal interest. Learning about your staff shows you care about them as individuals, not just as employees. That bond can influence their loyalty to your establishment and creates a since of family. One way to do this would be schedule a group time where you and your employees can sit and share things other than work- It builds relationship and camaraderie J

 

  • Provide tools to do the job. From proper equipment to training new staff, employees experience less stress when you set them up to do their jobs well and they become empowered to make decisions and knowledgeable .

 

  • Offer recognition. Employees want to know their hard work matters. Take a second during a team meeting to mention one of your employees who recently received a customer compliment or a line crew that performed particularly well on a busy night. Who doesn’t like to be in the spotlight for all the right reasons?

 

 

v Encourage communication. Wouldn’t you agree that we all should know where we stand with our leadership. By regularly communicating, leadership and employees can better understand one another and quickly resolve issues. Feedback is a learning tool that encourages growth and you’d be surprised at how you’d also find out other talents they may have.

Bullying

Hello Fellow followers!

Did you know that bullying not only occurs in schools and homes but also at work? – Yes work!

So how does this happen? Well according to Times Business and Money magazine authors- Bullying in the workplace continues because the leadership of the company often isn’t aware of their behavior, either because it goes unreported (many victims are too frightened or embarrassed to draw attention to their plight) or because the bullies are good at masking their behavior and/or fooling their superiors.

Many bullies are very socially skilled, and use their bullying behavior strategically to coerce others into providing them the resources needed to achieve their work-related objectives.

Facts about Bullying on the job -The workplace bullying Institute survey

  • 50% of Americans have not experienced or witnessed bullying, but 35% have been bullied; 15% have witnessed bullying.
  • Bosses comprise 72% of bullies.
  • More men (62%) are bullies and women are the most frequent targets of bullies (58%).
  • Women bullies target other women (80%).
  • Up to 81% of employers are perceived as doing nothing and resisting taking action when targets of bullying fill out a survey. In the general public, only 44.8% perceive the employers as doing nothing.
  • 45% of people targeted by a bully experience stress-related health problems including debilitating anxiety, panic attacks, and clinical depression (39%).

Types of bullying behaviors:

  • Exhibiting condescending behavior that puts people on edge and makes them unable to function professionally
  • Verbal
  • Physical threatening others
  • Intimidating others

 

How to stop bullying in the workplace?

  • Describe the behavior you see the bully exhibiting – don’t edit or offer opinions, just describe what you see. ie (You regularly enter my cubicle, lean over my shoulder, and read my personal correspondence on my computer screen.)
  • Tell the bully exactly how his/her behavior is impacting your work. (Because much of my work is confidential, these actions make me feel as if I need to hide what I am working on from you, or change a screen which is a waste of my time.)

 

Remember you want to be strategic when engaging the bully BUT you also want them to know that you will stand your ground if they continue to challenge you after you’ve addressed the disruptive behavior.



What not to ask

Hello fellow followers, did you know that having sharp interviewing skills is important to you landing the job. But did you also know that asking the wrong questions can lead to your interviewer questioning your candidacy? Take a look at the top five questions to NOT to ask in your first interview…

1.) How soon do you promote employees?

“An individual asking this question may come off as arrogant and entitled,” says recruiter Josh Tolan of SparkHire.com.

2.) Questions that start with “why?”

Why? It’s a matter of psychology. These kinds of questions put people on the defensive, says Kohut. She advises repositioning a question such as, “Why did the company lay off people last year?” to a less confrontational, “I read about the layoffs you had. What’s your opinion on how the company is positioned for the future?”

3.) “Who is your competition?”

This is a great example of a question that could either make you sound thoughtful … or totally backfire and reveal that you did zero research about the company prior to the interview, says Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter of CareerTrend.net. Before asking any question, determine whether it’s something you could have figured out yourself through a Google search. If it is, a) don’t ask it and b) do that Google search before your interview!

4.) “How often do reviews occur?”

Maybe you’re concerned about the company’s view of your performance, or maybe you’re just curious, but nix any questions about the company’s review or self-appraisal policies. “It makes us think you’re concerned with how often negative feedback might be delivered,” says Kohut. Keep your confidence intact, and avoid the topic altogether–or at least until you receive an offer.

5.) “May I arrive early or leave late as long as I get my hours in?”

Even if you make it clear that you’re hoping for a flexible schedule to accommodate a legitimate concern such as picking up your kids from daycare, Barrett-Poindexter advises against this question. “While work-life balance is a very popular concern right now, it’s not the most pressing consideration for a hiring decision-maker,” she says. “Insinuating early on that you’re concerned about balancing your life may indicate to your employer that you are more concerned about your needs and less concerned about the company’s.

Supportive Leaders

Hello fellow followers!

 Did you know that when you exhibit supportive behaviors in a genuine and authentic way you encourage and support your employees to become the very best they can be? Check out the following “how to be supportive tips” from Kevin Eikenberry

How to be support your employees to a win!

Collaborate. As a leader or supervisor, you cannot do everyone’s work, or do their work for them. You must, of course, delegate and empower others to do their work. And yet as a leader you must create a sense of shared ownership. You need to see yourself (and the team needs to see you) as a part of the team. While your role may be different, you are still a part of the team. When you see yourself, and act as a part of the team, others will feel supported in their actions

Empathize. To empathize is to understand how the other person feels. One of the most important things you can ever do is let people know you understand how they are feeling. You may not agree with their perspective, you may even think there were actions they could have taken to avoid the situation they now find themselves in (those may be points for personnel coaching at the appropriate time). But legitimately empathizing is one of the most supportive things you can do for another person or group.

Give positive feedback. Do you want to be more supportive? Tell people more often what they do well and what they are doing right. Almost no know hears this type of feedback often enough.

 Recognize someone’s value When you let people know you value them as an individual you are supporting them. When you do have to give feedback about performance, it is important that you separate performance from who they are. We are supportive when we care about people and show it (and not just say it).

Be quiet, and listen. When you listen you are showing you value their feelings and opinions. When you listen you are communicating that you care. This may seem so basic, but it is so powerful. Why?  Because most people reported that they are rarely truly listened to.

Recognize their goals and interests. People are more than their on-the job performance. When you know something about people’s strengths, interests and long term objectives, you can often help them reach those objectives and support those interests.

 

See you at the top!

The Two minute rule

Hello fellow followers! Let’s talk about procrastination

As the late Sir Isaac Newton taught us a long time ago, objects at rest tend to stay at rest and objects in motion tend to stay in motion. This is just as true for humans as it is for falling apples, and even though most of the tasks we procrastinate on aren’t actually difficult to do- we have the talent and skills to accomplish them. We find ourselves avoiding starting them for one reason or another.

What is the 2-minute rule?

The 2 minute rule comes from David Allen’s bestselling book, Getting Things Done. David recommends if it takes less than two minutes to complete the task-then do it now. ” The goal is to make it easier for you to get started on the things you should be doing. Now obviously every goal you have can’t be completed in 2minutes or less BUT every goal can be started in 2 minutes or less, and that’s the purpose behind this little rule.

Want to become a better writer? Just write one sentence (2–Minute Rule), and you’ll often find yourself writing for an hour.

Want to eat healthier? Just eat one piece of fruit (2–Minute Rule), and you’ll often find yourself inspired to make a healthy salad as well.

Want to make reading a habit? Just read the first page of a new book (2–Minute Rule), and before you know it, the first three chapters have flown by.

Want to run three times a week? Every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, just get your running shoes on and get out the door (2–Minute Rule), and you’ll end up putting mileage on your legs instead of popcorn in your stomach.

Remember what Sir Isaac Newton taught us…objects at rest tend to stay at rest and objects in motion tend to stay in motion.

What’s something that you can do now that will only take 120 seconds of your time? Do it right NOW!

 

 

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