Real-life advice from a real-life recruiter

Posts tagged ‘interviewing’

You Could Be Demotivating Your Employees

Did you know that motivation in the workplace not only improves productivity and performance levels, but it also means employees will feel happier in the workplace? –Ultimately improving retention and the performance of your employee.

OF COURSE YOU DO! And if you read last week’s blog, you know the importance of having an engaged employee and the costs of them not being engaged.

Today’s Blog will point out a few ways that you could possibly be demotivating your employee’s.

No vision:

If your brand has no vision, how can you expect your employee to have one too? A great way to motivate your employees is to include them in the vision of your brand. This way it boosts motivation and demonstrates you truly care about your team.

You never speak face to face:

Though email is effective, giving your employees enough face-to-face time individually dramatically improves their feelings off being connected to your business and to leaders. Instead of sending that email, think about walking over to your employee and relaying the message.

Dismissed ideas:

It is important to really listen to your colleagues and consider their ideas because there is nothing more de-motivating than having your fresh ideas dismissed immediately. Being shot down by your colleagues or managers can take its toll on confidence and with a lack of confidence often comes lack of motivation. So even if your employees’ ideas are completely different from yours, consider giving them a chance.

There’s no chance for development:

Something that many companies often find motivates their employees is the opportunity for growth within the company. It doesn’t have to be a huge promotion but can be as simple as inviting a speaker in for trainings for them to learn new things. This demonstrates to employees you appreciate their dedication and the employees’ feel developed.

“Yesterday is not ours to recover, but tomorrow is ours to win or loose.”

-Lyndon B Johnson

The Win-Win solution is Employee Engagement!

Greetings Fellow Followers!

Did you know that the number one way for leaders to build trust is to care for your employees? Your involvement and ability to engage yourself and peers is relevant to your development and important to the growth of your company.

What is employee engagement?

Some define it as how employees connect with customers and others as employee confidence, integrity, pride and passion or a heightened emotional connection that an employee feels for his or her organization, that influences him or her to exert greater discretionary effort to his or her work.

Is engaging employees important to companies?

Yes! Employee engagement and retention are crucial components to maintaining a happy, positive and productive workforce. The American Society for Training and Development completed a study on employee engagement that has shown companies loose $350 billion a year because of employee’s not being engaged.

Why so important?

Its simple- happier employees and higher profits. It’s a WIN-WIN!

Still need convincing? Below are business case facts on employee engagement.

  • 35% of US workers said they’d willingly forgo a substantial pay raise to see their direct supervisor fired. (The Employee Engagement Group, 2015)
  • Highly engaged employees have less absence days- in average 3.5 days- compared to not engaged employees (Gallup Germany, 2011)
  • Businesses with more engaged employees have 51% higher productivity (Harter, J.K,Schmidt, F.L., & Hayes T.L., Psychology, 2002 Vol 87, No.2)
  • Businesses with higher engagement have 9% higher shareholder returns (Towers Watson, 2009)
  • Organizations with engaged employees showed a 19% increase in operating income over a 12 month period, compared to a 33% decrease in companies with disengaged employees (Towers Perrin, 2008)
  • 80% of employees with a high degree of trust in management are committed to the organization, compared with 25% of employees with a low degree of trust ( Center for Creative Leadership, 2009)


Stay tuned for next weeks blog….”Ways you’re accidently demotivating your team”


“Sometimes not getting what you want is a wonderful stroke of luck.”- Dalai Lama

Hello Fellow Followers! We all can recall a time in life where we’ve been disappointed and though it can be frustrating we also understand that in life disappointments will come and go. Today I’m challenging you to adjust your perspective of being let down and encourage you to be empowered by failures.

Here are a few quick tips from Lori Deschene –co-founder of Create your life story, on how you can bounce back from failure and turn it into success:

Define success on your own terms.

Failure is a subjective term. If you have very rigid ideas of what it means to succeed, you will often feel disappointed. If there’s one thing that’s certain in life, it’s that nothing is certain, so why pin your sense of self-worth to something that may or may not happen?

Find the value in failure.

If you’re looking for a job and you don’t ace an interview, you could either decide you failed at that interview, or you succeeded in learning something to help you in the next—which might be an even better opportunity than the one that just past.

Focus on the process, not the results.

Just because you didn’t reach a specific goal you set, that doesn’t mean you can’t still do what you’d like to do. It’s not over just because you didn’t create one specific outcome. The benefit of adopting a process-oriented approach is that it’s easier to be mindful when you focus on the action steps. This doesn’t mean you stop setting goals and measuring your progress toward them. It just means let each step fuel your sense of meaning, joy, and accomplishment.

Accept that it isn’t always personal.

As much as we’d like to believe hard works always pays off, sometimes there are things beyond our control that have nothing to do with what we did or didn’t do. This may be the reason a lot of people try and try again only to achieve the same results. We can always find room for improvement, but sometimes we need to accept that results aren’t always reciprocal to efforts. However, we increase our odds of creating results if we choose to move forward regardless.

Feedback Helps You Grow

Hello Fellow followers!

Did you know that as a leader giving feedback is a responsibility you perform again and again? Letting people know where they are and where to go next in terms of expectations and goals – yours, their own, and the organizations.

Here are some tips on how to effectively give constructive feedback

  • Begin with the positive and with sincere praise and appreciation.
  • Avoid saying “You do this well, but…” because the follow up criticism wipes out the praise.
  • Point out the person’s importance to you and the organization.
  • Mention your own development areas and what you are doing about them.

Discussing the Results

  • Listening skills are the key to a successful feedback meeting
  • Let him or her do a great deal of the talking.
  • Ask many questions about his/her point of view
  • Put yourself in his/her shoes and really understand what he/she is saying
  • Focus not only on what the person says, but what he/she feels.
  • Let him/her draw their conclusions before giving your opinion

Giving your Point of view

  • Focus on behaviors and styles, not the person.
  • Avoid saying “you’re wrong” point blank; this just makes people defensive.
  • Show confidence that the person can improve… he or she can!

Setting Goals

  • Let the person set goals and strategies for development when possible.
  • Make sure your expectations are clearly stated in terms of behaviors or results. Avoid vague goals like “be more energetic”
  • Set up timetables for improvement.

So remember, your objective in giving feedback is to provide guidance by giving information in a useful manner, either to support effective behavior, or to guide someone back on track toward successful performance.


Do you think about what you think about…?

Hello Fellow followers!

Did you know researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health, completed a survey of over 1,300 healthy men, and found that pessimists had twice the risk of developing heart disease over a ten-year period compared to optimists? You can bet this made the optimistic men and their families- happy.  That’s huge! But sadly many of us continually postpone our happiness, and its not that we consciously set out to do so, but that we keep convincing ourselves, “Someday I’ll be happy”. We tell ourselves we’ll be happy when our bills are paid; when we complete school, get our first job or promotion. We convince ourselves that life will be better after we get married, or when our spouse gets his or her act together. Meanwhile, life keeps moving forward.

The Truth!

The truth is there’s no better time to be happier than right now. If not now, when? Your life will always be filled with challenges. It’s best to acknowledge this and decide to be happy anyway.

Here are a few of my favorite quotes about deciding to be happy …

Be happy with what you have and are, be generous with both, and you won’t have to hunt for happiness.” -William E Gladstone


“The most important thing is to enjoy your life- to be happy- it’s all that matters.” – Audrey Hepburn


“Happiness, true happiness, is an inner quality. It is a state of mind. If your mind is at peace, you are happy. If your mind is at peace, but you have nothing else, you can be happy. If you have everything the world can give – pleasure, possessions, power – but lack peace of mind, you can never be happy”. – Dada Vaswan


-Be happy with being you. Love your flaws. Own your quirks. And know that you are just as perfect as anyone else, exactly as you are. –Ariana Grande



Dress to Impress!

Hello fellow followers!

Did you know that your appearance and how you dress impacts the impression you give others about you? According to a study by Frank Bernieri, Ph.D., an associate professor of psychology at Oregon State University, within the first 10 seconds of meeting your interviewer–otherwise known as the meet-and-greet–that person has decided whether or not you’re right for the job.

What does this mean?

This means, those who come across as polished and pulled together are simply more likely to be hired than those who are seen as putting in less effort.

According to Bernieri, dressing the wrong way is equivalent to the worst social faux pas: “like picking your nose during an interview.”

How to Dress for an Interview:

You should familiarize yourself with the employer’s dress policy, and be observant of the company’s culture. In both an interview and in the workplace, it is always best to err on the side of caution.  When in doubt, select more professional, conservative clothing.

Here are some tips for how men and women should dress for an interview.

Men’s Interview Attire

  • Suit (solid color – navy or dark grey)
  • Long sleeve shirt (white or coordinated with the suit)
  • Belt
  • Tie
  • Dark socks, conservative leather shoes
  • Little or no jewelry
  • Neat, professional hairstyle
  • Limit the aftershave
  • Neatly trimmed nails
  • Portfolio or briefcase

Women’s Interview Attire

  • Suit (navy, black or dark grey)
  • The suit skirt should be long enough so you can sit down comfortably
  • Coordinated blouse
  • Conservative shoes
  • Limited jewelry (no dangling earrings or arms full of bracelets)
  • No jewelry is better than cheap jewelry
  • Professional hairstyle
  • Neutral pantyhose
  • Light make-up and perfume
  • Neatly manicured clean nails

So Remember, dressing professionally demonstrates respect, and also shows the employer that you take the interview seriously.


Eat’n Parks Summer Internship Rocks!

Hello Fellow followers! Check out this cool interview from one of Eat’n Parks summer interns.

Our Management Internship program is designed to provide college students the opportunity to explore a career with Eat’n Park restaurants!

The internship spans ten weeks and is modeled after our management training program.  This allows each intern the opportunity to experience all departments, learn management functions, and assist in running shifts under the supervision of the general manager.

Intern Interview

Please describe the most important things you learned during your internship

“The most important things I learned during my internship included learning the roles that every team member serves in the restaurant. Working in all of the different departments taught me how each department depends on each other. My duties included assisting in different department positions including greeting, serving, cooking, prep, baking, and assisting the managers with completing paperwork (shift cards, pull lists, prep lists, and pay roll)”

Describe which personal and professional strengths you have developed during you Management Internship.

“Professionally, I have developed a management presence. At first, I was nervous about managing a group of people but this experience has given me confidence in myself to do so. I developed practical skills in the kitchen, and prep areas. Personally, I’ve developed more confidence as well as personal drive to succeed in this field because I love it so much!”


What areas would you have like to develop further during your Internship experience?

“Honestly, the only thing that I wish is that the internship was longer. I know how to do the basics, but would have liked to work on finding the balance between wearing the different “hats” of management. I have always struggled with wearing the “police hat” and correcting people who are set in their own ways which are commonly wrong. Throughout this experience, I genuinely pushed myself to speak up more when needed.”

What did you enjoy the most about the internship?

“All of the people that I got to work with! It honestly started to feel like a little family. No matter how frustrating things would get at times, we all would come together to get the job done. This caused all of us to bond together-which makes the ending of the internship a little sad”

What could we do to make your internship better?

“The only thing I would recommend is to lengthen the internship program. I felt like I began to have a better understanding of the roles and responsibilities mostly towards the end of the internship. I found myself to be more confident in my role as a management intern once I was comfortable with the environment and setting.”

Would you recommend Eat’n Parks internship program to peers at your College/University?

“I would definitely recommend Eat’n Parks internship to anyone! I learned a lot of valuable knowledge and skills along with meeting and working with great people.”




Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 129 other followers